Friday, January 20, 2012

January New Release in Review: me@you.com by KE Payne


Cover:



Publisher:

Bold Strokes Books

Summary:

Is it possible to fall in love with someone you’ve never met? Imogen Summers thinks so – because it’s happened to her.

Immy is a normal 18 year old, with a normal life, a normal family and a normal boyfriend. But when she finds herself falling for a girl on an internet message board, a girl she knows only as the mysterious Fickle, her so-called normal life is suddenly turned on its head.

As her relationship with Fickle develops into more than just friendship, Immy finds another message board friend, the sweet and lovely Joey, the perfect person to confide in. But can Joey stay out of it when she starts to fall for Immy herself? Things are about to get complicated...

Why I Read This:

Out of my comfort zone (sometimes...you just have to).

Thoughts:

me@you.com started me off on a journey that I didn't know I even wanted to take. I've never read a GLBT book before. Of course, many books have had GLBT characters in them, but then, they just happened to be there. This one was different for me because not only was the main character a lesbian, it was also about her journey of self-discovery and realisation that other woman were who she wanted to be with.

I don't know what it was about this book but there was something in the summary that made me think I would like it more than I expected to (if that makes sense). I would not usually pick out a contemporary book with a GLBT character struggling with identity issues. I don't seem to connect well with the "identity issues" aspect of the books somehow. But then it didn't sound like the struggle was going to be a heart-wrenching, painful experience. And it wasn't.

I was actually really happy with this book. I liked the take on self-discovery the author decided to go with. There is of course tears and hurt for Imogen but that has less to do with the fact that she discovers she's into women and more to do with relationship issues and people taking advantage of her. From the moment she realises it, it's really more of a burden lifted and a joy that enters her life. It had depth but it was light-hearted at the same time. More dynamic than I expected.

As for the writing style, I enjoyed the online banter and chat-room talk. I liked the switch in perspectives. I am not a huge fan of books that are written all in chats or all in message boards, blogs, etc. I liked that it was mostly told from inside Imogen's head with a lot of chat interspersed throughout. What I didn't like was in those moments that Imogen was not thinking or chatting (and flirting) with her online buddies there was way too much telling rather than showing (I did this, then I did this, then this person came over, etc. etc). It was a shame because it really took away from the effect of the story for me. The other aspect of writing I found a little difficult was all those English slang words. I had never heard of a lot of them and so I found myself guessing what some things meant. I wouldn't say to change it, but as a Canadian (and not English) reader I would have liked some kind of glossary.

So this book won me over on GLBT books because I discovered that they can be more fun and uplifting than I assumed. I could see this book as a great thing to give young women going through these issues as well. I have since put several more of them into my "to-read" list and hope those go well for me too.

My Rating:



Disclaimer:

Received ARC from publisher via NetGalley.




This post was part of my New Year's Signature Collection event.
Watch out for more guest posts,  lists, reviews of January releases, author interviews, and more throughout January.



1 comment:

  1. Great review this actually looks pretty neat. I love the idea of the writing style with chats and different perspectives! Great review!

    Giselle
    Xpresso Reads

    ReplyDelete